Description The assignment for the Week 5 Discussion is as follows: 1. Sometim …

Description The assignment for the Week 5 Discussion is as follows: 1. Sometimes, you hear or read a statement that has an ambiguous word or expression, and this ambiguity allows you to interpret the statement in two (or more) different ways. Think of an example of this and then imagine the ambiguous statement occurring as a premise in an argument. For the first part of the prompt, provide an example of an argument with a premise that contains an ambiguous word or expression, where that ambiguity allows us to interpret the argument either charitably or uncharitably. Then offer both a charitable and an uncharitable interpretation of the argument. (It’s possible to have fun with this, but you may have to think for a bit about an ambiguous expression you’ve seen or heard recently). Here’s an example: A waitress in a diner asserts the following argument: (P) “The ham sandwich left without paying.” (C) “Somebody’s going to jail!” Uncharitable reading: ‘That’s crazy. A ham sandwich can’t literally “leave,” much less leave without paying. There’s no reason to think anybody’s going to jail.’ Charitable reading: ‘The customer who ordered the ham sandwich left without paying. Technically, that’s theft. So, maybe somebody is going to jail.’ 2. Second, raise an original question that occurred to you as you read Chapter 9

Description Hello , i have some work to do, everything is explained below . mak …

Description Hello , i have some work to do, everything is explained below . make sure to watch the videos , and there is questions to be done as well . After watching the videos for this week and reading chapter two from our text, please answer the following questions: As you can best describe, what did Aristotle mean by “eudaimonia”? Is eudaimonia the same thing that people mean today when they refer to “happiness”? Why or why not? Please use at least one specific example to make your case! (Initial posts should be at least five sentences in length . https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FWExd__bC7A https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PrvtOWEXDIQ Week #2: Aristotle This week we will take a look at an approach to ethical thinking known as “virtue ethics.” Virtue ethicists believe that, rather than focusing on the “rules” for right action, more of an emphasis should be placed on developing a good character. For Virtue Ethics, the central question is not “What should I do?” but rather, “What should I be?” As is still common practice, we will begin our discussion of virtue ethics by examining the ancient Greek philosopher Aristotle (384-322 BCE). Aristotle, along with Socrates and Plato, could be considered one of the “founding fathers” of virtue ethics – and who (among these three philosophers) gives us its most elaborate expression. In summary, Aristotle thought of “virtues” as those character traits that allowed us to flourish as individuals and as a society –and he argues that the highest good for man is a state of being he referred to as “eudaimonia.” Very often virtue ethicists tend to believe that too much emphasis is placed on debating controversial issues such as abortion and capital punishment. They will note that issues such as these are not what most people encounter on a day to day basis. While there are unwanted pregnancies, and you may occasionally be asked to vote on a referendum regarding capital punishment, these are not the types of questions that most people have to address day after day. However, all of us are sons and daughters. Most of us will become parents ourselves. Some of us become nurses, business owners, teachers, etc. The virtue ethicist will ask: “What are the characteristics of a “good” son or daughter? How does a “good” parent act? Basically: What would a good (or virtuous) person do in any given situation? This is a question that the ethically reflective person is concerned with at all times. Another motivating factor behind Virtue Ethics is the idea that – given the complexity of human life – it would be nearly impossible to formulate a set of rules that could address every possible situation. This seems to be what other ethical theories try to do. However, Virtue Ethics says that we’re better off focusing on character: This way we can be assured that regardless of what life throws at us, our *character* – who we *are* – will move us in the right direction! Reading Review #2 The reading for this week will be pages 21-33 from GT. 1. In Section 3 Aristotle states that “Our discussion will be adequate if it has as much clearness as the subject matter admits of, for precision is not to be sought for alike in all discussions, any more than in all the products of the crafts.” What does he mean by this? 2. *Why* does Aristotle think that “happiness” is the highest good? (Keep in mind that we are using “happiness” in a different sense than how this word is typically used today.) What are the “criteria” that *lead* Aristotle to the conclusion that “happiness” (i.e. “eudaimonia”) is the highest good? (See Section 5) 3. How does Aristotle argue for the idea that man must have a function? What does he conclude this function to be? (See Section 6) 4. Aristotle identified *two* types of virtue, what are they? How are they distinct and how do we go about acquiring each? (See Section 8)

Description How would Descartes’ Substance Dualism analyze the issue of perso …

Description How would Descartes’ Substance Dualism analyze the issue of personal Identity in respect to Dr. Smith? A.Descartes would say that Dr. Smith’s identity consists in her being psychologically continuous over time b.Descartes would say that Dr. Smith’s identity consists in her being a bundle of perceptions c.Descartes would say that Dr. Smith’s identity consists in her being the same material thing over time d.Descartes would say that Dr. Smith’s identity consists in the way her memories are connected over time e.Both (a) and (d) are correct f.None of the above are correct

Description “Stem cells are undifferentiated, primitive cells with the ability …

Description “Stem cells are undifferentiated, primitive cells with the ability both to multiply and to differentiate into specific kinds of cells. Stem cells hold the promise of allowing researchers to grow specialized cells or tissue, which could be used to treat injuries or disease (e.g., spinal cord injuries, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, diabetes, strokes, burns).” (Slevin, 2010) Choose ONE of the following issues and post to its thread with supporting evidence. Respond to two peers who wrote about issues other than the one you chose. Discuss what you feel are the potential benefits of stem cell research for Alzheimer’s patients and their families. Share your perspective on the stem cell debate regarding donation of surplus embryos to couples for “embryo adoption.” Why is the task of disposing unused frozen human embryos different from disposing of other medical tissue? Discuss why you think embryonic stem cell research “crosses a moral boundary.” 250 words minimum including reference and at least one in text citation